Whistleblowing about government surveillance: political offense or serious crime?

[cross-posted from http://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/blog]

It seems like the world has been turned upside down when a US citizen flees to China seeking political asylum.  And yet Edward Snowden is apparently hiding out in a secret location in Hong Kong after revealing that he is responsible for the leaked information on the US government’s PRISM program of surveillance.  He explains his choice of refuge as being based on Hong Kong’s reputation for defending freedom of speech.  He is also apparently considering Iceland as another potential refuge.  But if the US chooses to prosecute him, will he be able to avoid being sent home to face charges?  A key part of the answer lies in whether his leaking of official secrets qualifies as a ‘political offense’.

Continue reading Whistleblowing about government surveillance: political offense or serious crime?

One heck of a timely UN report on government surveillance of communications

If it had happened on House of Cards, you’d have enjoyed the theater of it, but figured that the writers had taken some artistic license in the timing.  I mean, it just doesn’t happen in real life that the UN releases a report on the dangers of government surveillance on the internet immediately before the news breaks that the US Government has been conducting internet surveillance of previously unimagined proportions.  Critics could unkindly say this is because the UN is never ahead of the game, but in this case, you have to hand it to Frank La Rue – he has clearly authored an exceptionally timely report: Continue reading One heck of a timely UN report on government surveillance of communications