Extraterritoriality and digital surveillance – time for the lawyers and the advocates to bring the dialogue together

This weekend, as an ex-bureaucrat, I felt for the folk at the State Department.  It must have been a ridiculously busy weekend for those preparing for this week’s Human Rights Committee Hearing in Geneva.  On Friday, the New York Times leaked Harold Koh’s legal advice acknowledging that the US obligations under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights do not stop at the border.  The NYT article would have meant that the briefing folders that had been merrily making their way up the clearance chain in time to be packed into the delegation’s suitcases would have been discarded (or at least the sections on extraterritoriality would have been yanked out) and all the talking points would have needed to be rewritten.

This is not just an important moment for bureaucrats or international human rights law junkies; it is potentially powerful for digital rights activists pushing for reform of global surveillance practices.  Digital rights advocates have been calling for the US government to end global mass suspicionless surveillance and to adhere to their international human rights law obligations.  There may be a strong moral case to support them, but when it comes to the NSA’s overseas activities, the discourse has often lacked a strong legal underpinning.  In order to push governmental policy on this issue, the dialogue needs to mature to the point where it is built on solid legal underpinnings.  The next couple of months bring an unprecedented opportunity to do just that. Continue reading Extraterritoriality and digital surveillance – time for the lawyers and the advocates to bring the dialogue together

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