Trust us, we’re the Government – sharing evidence internationally

It’s the nature of academic articles that by the time they’re published you’ve almost forgotten that you wrote them, particularly if the journal is an annual.  It is therefore pleasantly surprising that as my article on ‘Sharing Evidence Across Borders:  the human rights challenge’ is published ((2012) 30 Aust YBIL 161), I find that the topic is still very much current and the questions raised are still relevant, possibly even more so than when I wrote it a couple of years ago.

Being able to transfer evidence between countries is essential for cross-border investigations and prosecutions.  Even aside from crime types that are obviously transnational in nature such as drug trafficking or international money laundering, everyday crimes are easily given a ‘transnational’ aspect if the criminals use international email providers, have a foreign bank account or if a key witness lives in another country.  Clearly, public policy dictates that investigations and prosecutions can’t be allowed to stop at the border.  To fill this gap Mutual Legal Assistance Treaties (MLATs), law enforcement cooperation and letters rogatory have developed.  However, transferring evidence into another jurisdiction can have significant human rights implications.

After authorities in one country hand evidence over to another country, they may lose control and visibility of how that evidence is used.  And yet, instinctively, it seems like a country should not be able to wash its hands of all responsibility after handing over evidence.  When legal cooperation is used to move people rather than evidence (ie extradition), there are very clear human rights protections.  An abolitionist country cannot extradite or deport a person to a country if there is a real risk that he or she may be subject to the death penalty.  Similar obligations arise if a country wishes to extradite a person to a country where there is a real risk of a person being subject to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.  However, there is no such obligation if one country provides evidence to another country and that country then uses the information to impose the death penalty, torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment on an individual.

Many see this as unjust and there is a temptation to extend the international law that applies to extradition to MLATs and law enforcement cooperation.  After all, the consequences for individuals can be just as dire when countries share evidence as when they cooperate for extradition.  However, if you carefully analyse the extradition jurisprudence and try to apply it to evidence-sharing, you encounter a number of significant logical and legal problems.

In order to be practical and politically-palatable, there must be limits on a country’s human rights obligations.  International human rights law obligations are therefore generally limited to persons within that country’s jurisdiction.  When evidence is provided to foreign countries, it usually affects individuals in the foreign country.  It is difficult to find a logical way to argue that those individuals are within the ‘jurisdiction’ of the country providing evidence.  There are a couple of unique situations in which international human rights law has been found to apply to individuals extraterritorially.  These include where an individual is under that country’s effective control (eg prisons operated in Iraq by allied forces) or for particular rights such as the issuing of a passport or the enforcement of a judgment in absentia.  When you analyse these extraterritorial situations, they seem to be fundamentally different from a person about whom a foreign country facilitates providing evidence.

I therefore argue that international human rights law does not create any obligations with respect to law enforcement cooperation or mutual legal assistance.  This is not to say that there should not be legal obligations, just that they do not currently exist under international human rights law.  Any attempt to create obligations needs to engage with the complexity of the issue, not just assume that the same rules that apply to extradition can be applied to evidence-sharing.

The treaties that create evidence-sharing relationships provide some protections by specifying situations in which the requested country may refuse to provide evidence.  Such situations include where the death penalty would be imposed or there is a real risk of torture.  However, this is permissive rather than mandatory.  Moreover, MLATs and agreements on law enforcement cooperation are negotiated on an ad hoc basis and there is no uniformity in approach.  In the end, it all comes down to the particular policies of the administration that negotiated the treaty and the policies in place at the time that it is asked to provide the evidence.

The government makes decisions about which countries it is appropriate to enter into evidence-sharing relationships with and on what terms.  There is also scope to make decisions about specific requests.  For example, the requested country may specify that evidence will only be provided if the other country gives certain assurances (eg not to impose the death penalty).  Enforcement of such undertakings is a diplomatic matter.  In this way, the responsibility to make the right decisions about who to do business with and on what terms is largely a matter for the executive.

The system is further complicated when third parties hold the requested evidence, and these parties have their own relationship with the owner of the information.  The most pressing current example is online records.  Companies such as Google and Facebook hold large amounts of user data and many of their users reside in foreign jurisdictions.  The relationship of trust between these companies and their users is a valuable part of their business.  Being a good corporate citizen and cooperating with law enforcement to combat crime may also be important, but the priorities are not necessarily always compatible.

This somewhat changes the assumption that evidence-sharing can be handled adequately on a purely diplomatic basis because you have an additional party with a different set of interests.  This is not a new problem; for many years, countries have been sharing bank and telephone records.  However, the scale of the issue has certainly grown, with users storing more and more personal data online and increasing numbers of these users being in different jurisdictions from the tech companies.

These companies can scrutinize the requests that flow through from the Department of Justice or law enforcement to ensure that the legal requirements have been met.  However, where the discretion is a matter for the executive, the companies have limited options.  It is for the government to decide whether the other country’s justice system is adequate or undertakings are sufficient.  Provided that the other legal requirements are met, the company is obliged to hand over their user’s information.  Essentially, the system is based on trust that governments will do the right thing.

The increasing role of third party holders of information brings another dimension to the question of civil liberties protections in international evidence sharing.  It means that there is a new voice in the debate.  While governments have tended to keep evidence sharing confidential, tech companies are increasingly going public about government requests for user data.  Companies may challenge government requests in the courts on behalf of their users and raise public awareness about any perceived deficiencies in the laws.  What has tended to be an obscure area of government practice where the lack of legal protections has gone largely unnoticed now has the potential to become an issue of public discussion and concern.

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Transparency – but what are we seeing?

Now that Microsoft has come to the party and is publishing a regular transparency report, there is a meaningful amount of publicly-available data about government requests for online records.  Looking at the data from Google, Twitter, Dropbox and Microsoft side-by-side raises some interesting questions.

The trend towards publishing transparency reports is a welcome one.  It raises awareness and encourages users to think about what protections they’re entitled to and how private their online activities really are.  There are still some very noticeable gaps in the information available.  Facebook and Yahoo! store large amounts of personal data but are noticeably silent on the issue of transparency reports.  Perhaps they will follow in Microsoft’s footsteps and finally succumb to the pressure for transparency.

Consumer and privacy advocacy groups are alarmed at the increased volume of government data requests.  Back in January, EFF reported on the ‘troubling trend’ of the rise in government surveillance because there had been a 70% increase in requests for data since Google started releasing numbers in 2010.  Forums are awash with comments about government snooping and conspiracy theories.  Meanwhile, at last week’s Committee on the Judiciary Hearing, Richard Littlehale from the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation argued for calm in considering the increase in government requests.  He analysed the statistics as demonstrating that ‘just a tiny fraction of one percent of Google’s accounts were affected by government demands’.

Comparing the transparency reports of the different companies shows that Microsoft/Skype and Google are inundated with requests for data.  As you would expect, relative newcomers Dropbox and Twitter receive far fewer requests.  In 2012, there were 122,015 requests relating to Microsoft accounts, 15,409 requests relating to Skype accounts, 68,249 Google accounts, 2,614 Twitter accounts and 164 Dropbox accounts. Each of these statistics relates to the number of accounts affected.  As each user could have multiple accounts, this does not directly equate to the number of individuals affected but nonetheless gives a sense of the scale of the issue.

These are some pretty impressive numbers and they’re on the rise.  The volume of requests to Google has grown significantly even during the short 3 years that they have been publishing their transparency report.  Although the data is not available, it seems reasonable to assume that the other companies are also experiencing significant increases.  Just what do these statistics mean?  Is it time to sound the Orwellian alarm bells?

Of course, more users have been sending, posting and storing information online.  This comes not only from more users engaging with online products, but also through the expanded type of products being offered.  The growth in cloud computing and cloud product offerings such as Google Drive mean that there is more information being held by third parties.  Higher penetration of online products not only means more cute cats and emails home to Mom, but also more use by criminal elements.  This naturally piques the interest of law enforcement officers.

As law enforcement becomes more familiar with the use of online records as evidence, more officers appreciate its value and employ it as one of their investigative tools.  The process has also been simplified and demystified.  Only a few years ago, it was an impenetrable maze to try to work out how to request online records for most of the providers.  Now, many of the companies have publicly accessible guides for law enforcement.  This means that it’s not just the high-tech crime units that are aware of the ability and value in accessing online records, but also the local county sheriffs.

Upward trends in law enforcement requests for records from particular online products can also reveal that some applications are particularly attractive to criminal elements.  For example, in the past, certain messaging applications became havens for child pornography rings to the extent that the product was discontinued.  Criminals will always look for weaknesses in the system and loopholes where they feel that they can communicate with impunity.  Police will naturally want to follow these trends and pursue criminals by accessing these records.  At the same time, innocent users have a valid expectation of privacy over their communications.

This all means that more users are putting more information online and it’s being accessed by a wider range of law enforcement officers.  I don’t think this is necessarily alarming in itself – we are no longer in a society where people (innocent or criminal) handwrite their private documents and store them under lock and key in their filing cabinet and investigative techniques have to adjust accordingly.  However, it does mean that it is increasingly important to ensure that there are adequate systems in place for the way in which this information is stored, accessed and used.

The discussion of this issue is hardly in its infancy; reform of ECPA has been on and off the cards for years (culminating in the last-minute failure to pursue the legislative amendments at the end of last year).  At last week’s committee hearing, there was a new level of consensus that access to users’ content should only be through showing of probable cause.  However, underneath this veneer of agreement, each of the witnesses revealed important differences of opinion.  The Department of Justice advocated substantial carve-outs from the probable cause standard should be afforded for civil litigation.  The law enforcement representative had a wish list including access to SMS messages and mandatory time limits on compliance with government requests.  Questioning by committee members revealed that there was confusion about the difference between traffic data and content and a troubling lack of understanding about how services such as targeted advertising on Gmail accounts affects privacy.  As with most legislative reform, the devil is in the detail and there is a lot of work ahead before there can be agreement on a Bill.

Access to online records needs to be addressed now.  The uncertainties between different jurisdictions and the growing agreement that aspects of ECPA infringe the fourth amendment of the Constitution are unacceptable both from a user’s perspective and also from the commercial perspective of companies that have to navigate this legal minefield on a daily basis.  The law is certainly in need of reform and the problem is only going to get worse.  However, the statistics do not necessarily mean that we are in the grip of a government conspiracy.  While we are no longer in the 1986 world of the original ECPA, we are also a long way from George Orwell’s 1984.

Julian Assange – epic failure of the international human rights system?

Over the coming weeks and months, international lawyers and commentators will no doubt be falling over themselves to write about the issues raised by Julian Assange’s stalled extradition process and dramatic receipt of diplomatic asylum.  Who could blame us when this case raises so many unusual and complex issues of international law and politics? What interests me most is the fact that the Government of Ecuador has effectively declared its distrust of the human rights protections offered by the extradition and criminal justice processes of three countries.  Not just any countries, mind you; Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States.  While no country’s justice system is perfect, these three countries arguably have some of the world’s most advanced legal systems for extradition and human rights protection and yet we have seen Ecuador invoke the laws of diplomatic asylum to protect Assange where these systems have allegedly fallen short. Continue reading Julian Assange – epic failure of the international human rights system?

What is the greatest risk to online rights – government, companies or anarchy?

Nick Merrill is building an internet service provider called Calyx. Calyx will be designed to encrypt user’s data in such a way that it’ll be inaccessible to anyone but that user. Which means that if the government asks for your browser history or emails, Calyx will be technologically unable to hand them over.’.

When I stumbled across this, I was horrified.  As a civil servant and government lawyer, I bridled at the blatant attempt to undermine the criminal justice process.  But then I read on and watched videos of Nick Merrill telling his story of fighting a national security letter requiring him to disclose details about one of the clients of his ISP company.  It is quite compelling to hear of his 6 year battle for recognition of his entitlement to speak with his attorney and his right to tell others that he was issued with a national security letter.  So Nick Merrell’s encrypted ISP project started to sound less like paranoia and more like a rational reaction.

Just this week, I read that at the recent Black Hat Conference, when the room full of internet and security professionals was asked who they trusted less, Google or the government, the majority raised their hands for Google.  This surprised me, given the deeply ingrained distrust of big government and led me to wonder whether we were sliding into a situation in which the public will not trust anyone with regulation of online activities.  Is the web to become a wild west of anarchy because we are too afraid to trust anyone with any form of monitoring or enforcement? Continue reading What is the greatest risk to online rights – government, companies or anarchy?

Going beyond the guidelines – legal and moral responsibilities on ICT companies

YouTube this week introduced a face-blurring tool to protect activists from being recognised by their online activities.  Human rights groups will no doubt welcome the initiative as it comes in response to calls from groups such as Witness.  Some web companies demonstrate a commitment to not only reducing the negative human rights impacts of their activities, but also to actively improving the positive impacts that they may have.  The uptake of some of the voluntary guidelines on corporate social responsibility and human rights demonstrates a willingness to go beyond the minimum requirements.  But what responsibilities do tech companies really owe to users in other countries?  Is this solely a question of moral responsibility and ethics, or is there a legal obligation?  And should moral responsibility be reflected in a legally-binding regime? Continue reading Going beyond the guidelines – legal and moral responsibilities on ICT companies

Guide to the guidelines – human rights, business and the ICT sector

Complex and interesting areas of international legal policy can be difficult to navigate.  Once an issue gains a profile in policy circles, everyone with an interest in the topic rushes to develop guidelines to help others navigate the area.  While the issue of human rights and web companies is still comparatively new, there are guidelines from the field of corporate social responsibility that can be drawn upon.  ICT-specific guidelines are also mushrooming at the moment.  In light of this, I thought it timely to develop a quick guide to the guidelines.

There is an abundance of material on corporate social responsibility, with some of it approaching human rights more broadly and some creating sector specific guidance.  I will outline a couple of the key general CSR guideline initiatives and the guidelines that are specific to the ICT sector.  Once you start delving into specific issues such as environmental sustainability, fair trade or bribery or markets with particular vulnerabilities such as conflict zones, you find a whole host of additional stakeholders and reference materials.  Some notable examples include the OECD Risk Awareness Tool for Weak Governance Zones, the ILO Tripartite Declaration of Principles concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy and the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative. Continue reading Guide to the guidelines – human rights, business and the ICT sector

MLA – are there too many cooks?

When managing mutual legal assistance (MLA) requests on a day-to-day basis, the main complaints from prosecutors and police are incredulity at how long a request may take to process, and frustration at the complexity of the process involved.  Depending on the country from which information is being sought, it can also be the case that the country holding the information is not willing or able to obtain it on behalf of another country.

As noted previously, MLA involves many players in multiple steps: police and central authorities in both the requesting and the requested countries as well as sometimes judges, prosecutors and witnesses in the requested country.  The steps are generally governed by a combination of domestic laws and international treaties (either bilateral or multilateral).  Law enforcement officers are inclined to argue that MLA has too many processes and protections, while civil libertarians tend to argue that there are not enough safeguards in place.  There may be some agreement from both sides that there is not sufficient differentiation between the processes or safeguards that are necessary in some circumstances and what may be appropriate in circumstances where the information is less sensitive or the information is being shared with a trusted partner country.

In order to make the MLA system faster and less complicated, governments (and the public that they represent) need to be willing to either reduce the number of steps in the process and/or make each of the steps faster.  Many countries, including the US, have omitted the step of requiring an MLA request to be made and received through diplomatic channels.  To further reduce the number of players in a meaningful way requires a more fundamental shift in the MLA process.

Continue reading MLA – are there too many cooks?